mardi 27 mars 2012

Man, I'd Live In Rapture: New Year's End Bioshock Short

Geekologie - Gadgets, Gizmos, and Awesome
bioshock-fanfilm.jpg This is a Bioshock fan-film called New Year's End. I watched it. Of course, I'd view anything Bioshock related which may explain how I wound up watching 40-minutes of a man-on-man porno after my roommate wrote 'BIOSHORK' real big on the DVD.
Preceding the events of BioShock 1 and 2, this short gives a look at a very significant event in Rapture's history. In the lowest parts of the city, a small group of splicers have something planned that will change the course of Andrew Ryan's vision of utopia. Best watched in HD fullscreen with the sound up!
Not gonna lie, I did watch it in 240p on mute, so maybe I did it wrong. "You do everything wrong." I...am a giant failure. "Have you ever conside--" ALL THE TIME. "I was gonna say seeking help?" Help? No. Hit the jump for the return to Rapture.
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'Total Recall' Trailer Teaser Promises Guns, Explosions

Geekologie - Gadgets, Gizmos, and Awesome
total-recall-teaser-teaser.jpg Joel Kinnaman's excitement over having a translucent visor has us today staring squarely into RoboCop's newly-visible eyes, but let's not forget that there's another Paul Verhoeven sci-fi-satire remake on the way and much nearer to theaters. Underworld director Len Wiseman has already remade Total Recall with Colin Farrell in the lead, and has it prepped for an August release. A full trailer for the film is expected on Sunday, but if you can't wait, here's a 30-second teaser that will basically just assure you, don't worry, Len Wiseman made sure to put some guns and explosions in this thing. He knows what matters!
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10 Great Tips on Logo Designs from the Field

Graphic Design Forum and Web Design Forum
Hi guys :tt2: I’ve learned from quite a few mistakes during my time as a designer, and to save you from doing likewise, here are 10 logo design tips I picked up.
1. A logo doesn’t need to say what a company does


Restaurant logos don’t need to show food, dentist logos don’t need to show teeth, furniture store logos don’t need to show furniture. Just because it’s relevant, doesn’t mean you can’t do better.
The Mercedes logo isn’t a car. The Virgin Atlantic logo isn’t an aeroplane. The Apple logo isn’t a computer. Etc. Etc.
2. Not every logo needs a symbol


Sometimes a client just needs a professional wordmark to identify their business. Don’t be afraid to ask what they think.
3. Two-way process


Remember, things might not always pan out as you hope. Your client might request something you disagree with. If that happens, try giving them what they want, then show them what you believe is an improvement, and why. They’re less likely to be so resistant if they already see how their thoughts pan out.
4. Picasso started somewhere


You don’t need to be an artist to realise the benefits of logo sketching. Ideas can flow much faster between a pen and paper than they can a mouse and monitor.
5. Under-promise, over-deliver


If you’re unsure how long a task will take to complete, estimate longer. Design projects are like construction work — you piece lots of little elements together to form a greater whole, and setbacks can crop up at any time.
6. Leave trends to the fashion industry


Trends come and go, and when you’re talking about changing a pair of jeans, or buying a new dress, that’s fine, but where your brand identity is concerned, longevity is key.


Don’t follow the pack.

Stand out.
7. Work in black first
By leaving colour to the end of the process, you focus on the idea. No amount of gradient or colour will rescue a poorly designed mark.
8. Keep it appropriate


Designing for a lawyer? Ditch the fun approach. Designing for a kid’s TV show? Nothing too serious. I could go on, but you get the picture.
9. A simple logo aids recognition


Keeping the design simple allows for flexibility in size. Ideally, your design should work at a minimum of around one inch without loss of detail. Look at the logos of large corporations like Mitsubishi, Samsung, FedEx, BBC etc. Their logos look simple and are easier to recognise because of it.
10. One thing to remember


That’s it. Leave your client with just one thing to remember about the design. All strong logos have one single feature to help them stand out.


Not two, three, or four.


One.
Hit thanks if this Post helped you.
If you are having problems with logo designs you may reply, :balloon:
hxxp://www . logodesignlove .com/ logo-design-tips
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Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard

Abduzeedo | Graphic Design Inspiration and Photoshop Tutorials

Who doesn't like movie posters? Probably very few people, because as far as I know, people love an awesome poster hanging on their walls. David Amblard definitely love to put his own vision on some classic movies.

David Amblard is a French illustrator, and his posters are really, really stylish. His take on posters of classic, cult movies, are quite impressive. I wonder if any of these are for sale. People would love to buy some of them. Anyways, these are only a few of his pieces. For more, you should check his portfolio at Behance. I hope you enjoy these! Cheers. ;)


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard


Fantastic Movie Posters by David Amblard

About the author

Hello, everyone! I'm Paulo Gabriel, designer from Porto Alegre, Brazil, born in 1984. I have worked as a webdesigner since 2006, but websites and blogs have been a hobby for me since 1999. Here in Abduzeedo, I try to bring only the hot stuff for you... and hope that all of you enjoy my posts! For more cool stuff, you may also follow me on Twitter.

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Play Logotype

Graphic Design Blog & Web Design Blog


Design by Vasilis Magoulas aka VAMADESIGN.
For more photos of the "PLAY" project visit his Website.
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mardi 20 mars 2012

Starting a Design Project

Abduzeedo | Graphic Design Inspiration and Photoshop Tutorials

We have been posting tutorials pretty much every week for the past 6 years. We believe tutorials are an amazing way to learn how to use the software we need to do our design work. But as you can see, software is just a part of the design process, important but without a good foundation and design principles you won’t be able to translate a good idea into a cohesive design...even if you are a master of Illustrator, Photoshop or any other software.

With this in mind we wanted to go a bit deeper in terms of the tutorials we post here on Abduzeedo. Our goal will be to alternate tutorials showing techniques and how to use software with posts on the theory behind the design process.

For this first post we want to talk about the first step of a design work. From understanding what the project is all about, to briefing. This is probably one of the most important parts of the creative process because it’s how you will set your strategy in terms of what to explore.

The first priority when getting a new project underway is to understand exactly what the project is about. I know it might sound obvious but it’s a little bit more complicated. Below I’ve listed a few important questions I ask myself prior to embarking on a certain design project :

  • What exactly is the product or service I will be working on? Can I explain the product or service to other people clearly and concisely?
  • Who will be using the product?
  • What the audience accustomed to and what we think would be better if we used this product ourselves?
  • What is the vision the company has for their product or service? How much are they willing to commit in terms of radical changes?

What’s the product or service?

Having a deep understanding of the product you will be working on is vital for your design work. Not only because it gives you the information you need to start designing but this tactic will also give you the motivation to challenge yourself in creating a better product or service overall.

If you think about personal projects, we always do things we like because we challenge ourselves to learn something new while making our ideas come true in our personal work. We have all the motivation we need to do that. We control the whole process of the creative process.

For professional projects it is the same, once we have an idea of the scope of the project and the possibilities we can strive and innovate. Otherwise frustration ensues and we end up chasing our own tail.

“A product is bought to be used. It has to satisfy certain criteria, not only functional, but also psychological and aesthetic. Good design emphasizes the usefulness of a product whilst disregarding anything that could possibly detract from it.” - Dieter Rams

Who will be using the product or service? What is the audience accustomed to and what do we think would be better if we used this product ourselves?

We always mention this in our posts or any event we have the chance to speak at but it’s the number one rule for any designer: Who is your audience and what’s the problem you are solving for them with your design?

Drawing another parallel with personal projects. When we are doing work for ourselves we are our own audience and that gives us freedom to do things we want or apply our personal style.


Rawz - personal project to help users share their inspiration

With professional work it is different. That might be a bit of a controversial statement but I believe when designing something for a particular audience we have to understand their needs and the best way to reach them. My personal style might be completely useless. The same applies to trends. As Dieter Rams says “Good design is long-lasting”. Make your design useful and efficient. Trends come and go and if you make yourself a product of a trend you might be useless as well.

“It avoids being fashionable and therefore never appears antiquated. Unlike fashionable design, it lasts many years – even in today’s throwaway society.” - Dieter Rams

What is the vision the company has for their product or service? How much are they willing to commit in terms of radical changes?

Gathering all the information about the project is not only mandatory in understanding the product or service but also enables a clear idea of what the company you are working for is willing to commit to the design work. What is the posture towards radical changes?

Questions about marketing and branding strategies is very important because this will give you hints on what to explore in terms of design but also on how to justify your design decisions.

A lot of frustration we hear from other designers is that people they are working for don’t understand the importance of the change in colors or attention to minute details, or even radical changes such as redesigning from scratch.

In really I believe it’s not that they don’t get it, they just need a good reasoning behind such change. In the end, design is not art but business and it has to be treated like that. Innovation comes from change, but we designers find that through iteration, A/B testing, interviewing the audience and a bevy of other ways to justify our work based on real data.

Here are some simple questions that the super talented designer and branding expert Roger Oddone usually ask his clients:

  • What's the name of the company/ product?
  • What service do you offer?
  • Who are your main competitors?
  • How does your service differ from them?
  • Who is your target/ existing audience?
  • Do you have any benchmarks?


Corporate and brand identity Taiama by Roger Oddone


Corporate and brand identity Taiama by Roger Oddone


Corporate and brand identity Taiama by Roger Oddone

Clearleft, one of my favorites design studios, has a very complete design brief that they share on their Web site. You can download it here

With all this information, we hope that you will have all you need to start your creative process and move to the second phase: Research and Inspiration. Stay tuned for more on that topic in our next post....and as always, if you have anything to add to this tutorial, please don’t hesitate to share with us here via comments and external links.

About the author

Abduzeedo is a blog about design. There are all sorts of articles for those who want to look for inspiration. Also you will find very useful tutorials for the most used applications out there, with a special selection of Photoshop Tutorials and Illustrator Tutorials. You can get in follow us via Twitter at @abduzeedo

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Pour une critique du design graphique

manystuff.org — Graphic Design daily selection

Pour une critique du design graphique
Dix-huit essais

Catherine de Smet

Comment le logo du Centre Pompidou a-t-il été créé? Une théorie urbaine peut-elle s’exprimer dans la conception matérielle d’un livre? Le design graphique a-t-il servi la cause des femmes? En quoi consistent les archives spécialisées? Les textes réunis ici racontent des histoires de signes et d’objets: identités visuelles, affiches et imprimés divers, livres, pochettes de disque ou caractères typographiques. La production de nombreux graphistes est examinée à travers des champs variés, de l’architecture au jazz, de l’art contemporain à la littérature et à l’édition pour la jeunesse. Composant majeur de la culture visuelle contemporaine, le design graphique façonne notre environnement: il requiert donc la plus grande attention.

Ouvrage illustré avec les œuvres de Muriel Cooper, Dominique Darbois, Paul Cox, Wim Crouwel, Wim Delvoye, Thomas Hirschhorn, Bruce Mau, Philippe Millot, Norm, Vier 5, Jean Widmer, Le Corbusier, Red Miles, Jim Flora et d’autres.

Présentation, 23-25 Mars, 2012
pendant PA/PER VEW, Wiels, Bruxelles

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jeudi 15 mars 2012

Monthly review, Vol. XXV

idsgn (a design blog): Design and branding news

Image

  1. Feltron 2010/2011 Biennial Report

    Nicholas Felton releases the latest installment in his annual reports, full of beautiful data visualizations.

  2. 2012 campaign logos

    Heller, Millman, and Twemlow weigh in on the U.S. presidential campaigns.

  3. It’s a window… not a flag

    Pentagram’s Paula Scher redesigns the iconic Microsoft Windows logo.

  4. Disruptive wonder

    Speaking at TEDx, Brooklyn-based designer Kelli Anderson inspires disruptive wonder through her work.

  5. Letters, numbers, & glyphs

    Chris Rushing draws letters, numbers, & glyphs and posts them to Tumblr.

  6. Unpaid internships?

    Thomas Wilder takes on the controversial subject.

  7. 100 best typefaces of all time

    Judged by type experts including Roger Black and Veronika Elsner, FontShop’s “100 Best Typefaces of All Time” is now available in Engligh.

  8. The Harriet series

    Okay Type releases The Harriet Series, a handsome new serif typeface set with 8 text and 12 display styles.

  9. Love is making its way back home

    Erez Horovitz directs a music video for Josh Ritter using 12,000 pieces of construction paper (and no post-production).

  10. Extreme Photoshop makeovers

    Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano gives famous artworks extreme Photoshop makeovers in her Venus project.

  11. 6 rules of movie poster design

    Travis Pitts nails the biggest design clichés in movie posters today.

  12. 60 girls with the dragon tattoo

    A look at how Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is branded across the globe.

  13. Introducing Dropmark

    Dropmark is a cloud collaboration and sharing app for creative professionals.

  14. New logo for AP

    Objective Subject redesigns the identity for Associated Press.

  15. Kern and Burn

    Kern and Burn curates discussions about design entrepreneurship.

  16. Cats as fonts

    20 fonts and the cats that clearly inspired them.

  17. Everything was made

    Designer and writer Frank Chimero launches a new website.


Also see:

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