dimanche 30 janvier 2011

DIY : Create a DIY Writer's Wallet [DIY]


If you don't go anywhere without your notebook, then a writer's wallet may be for you. Reader Conor Buick shares his method for creating a notebook-turned-wallet hybrid. More »

 

 

 

Create a DIY Writer's WalletIf you don't go anyw

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here without your notebook, then a writer's wallet may be for you. Reader Conor Buick shares his method for creating a notebook-turned-wallet hybrid.

What we are going to make today is a Writer's Wallet, so everyone please access their inner Martha Stewart. Basically, my writer's wallet is a notebook with a few modifications for carrying my cash and cards.

I used the Ecosystem small-size notebook found here.

Philosophy

Note: If you're looking for the simplest possible solution for a writing wallet, you could buy a previously mentioned Pico Pad (a credit card sized pad with a micro pen found here.

This is a tool that will encourage you to write more (or at least that's what it does for me). That's the whole idea behind this. You pull your wallet out often, so perhaps when you have it out, you'll write your next genius insight and turn into Jon Franzen or Twitterer @badbanana (aka Tim Siedell, creative director and joke maker). Some people will be quick to point out, "Hey, why don't you just keep the two separate and pull them out together?" But I have no time for those people. It's a noble idea, which coincidentally, can seem like the dumbest ones, similar to bringing a book to the coffee shop.

What You'll Need

Create a DIY Writer's Wallet

  • Scissors
  • Stretchy bands
  • Super Glue (I used Loctite Control Gel which was excellent, but anything that dries quickly will do)
  • Exacto Knife
  • Cardboard/Strong paper
  • NOTEBOOK (duh)
  • Optional: Ruler

Step 1: Make the Magic Wallet

Create a DIY Writer's Wallet
First, we're going to make and incorporate a "Magic Wallet" into our notebook. The Instructable for the Magic Wallet can be found here, and the video below demonstrates how it works (you've likely seen one before).

Tip: Cut your bands longer than needed, it's easy to pull them off the cardboard and re-glue, then just cut off the excess.

He calls it a Clever Wallet—insanity right? The picture shows basically what to do. Once you fold the bands across, place your other piece of cardboard over the bands, and fold back/glue the bands' ends to the cardboard.

Then glue your new magic wallet to the cover of the notebook. Glue doesn't need to canvas the whole cover if it's super glue (it's always easy to add more later if needed).

Step 3: Cut Slots for Your Credit Cards and Finish Your Writer's Wallet

Create a DIY Writer's Wallet
The back of an Ecosystem notebook has a little pouch for storing torn out pages. We'll use that for storing credit cards and such. Now you could just leave the pouch alone and simply store cards sloppily away. We're classier than that. We just need to make a few simple slits with an exacto knife.

I only have 4 cards, perfect for this. All you have to do is stand one card vertically on the pouch. Stand it at an angle like the picture if you want. I've found it's easier to slide the card back in its slot if it's at an angle. Once you've found, more or less, where you want your cards to go, trace along the vertically standing card a straight pencil line. Do that 4 times like the picture. The image has all 4 pencil lines in it. Each one is at a slightly different angle for no reason other than to keep things spicy. Now just cut along each line with an exacto knife. Cut a bit beyond each line so the card fits in easily (always easy to cut more later though).

Tip: You can make another pouch out of cardstock if you have more cards and glue it inside the front cover for more card storage.

Create a DIY Writer's WalletYou're done with your new Magic Wallet-Notebook hybrid. The notebook band keeps the wallet closed. I have the bills standing straight up. Unfortunately, the bills extend just a bit beyond the dimensions of the notebook (the mint didn't think of Ecosystem notebooks when designing American bills).

Note: when opening the wallet, it automatically pushes the notebook band to the side, opening the notebook.

Another Alternative

Create a DIY Writer's Wallet
This is a new writer's wallet. Simpler design. I used a black Ecosystem notebook and made a little pouch out of some semi-durable paper.

Just glue the pouch to the back/front of your notebook. My red pouch is on the back of my notebook so when I'm writing, the money is safe between my hand and notebook. The pouch is a bit wider on its backside so bills catch that and slip in easier. My pouch is that particular length for no reason. I could have made it the width of the bills and stored the bills the other way than showing below, maybe for the next Wallbook/Notellet. I used the same card storage as the last notebook.

You could also put the pouch inside the notebook so the money is safer and you have to open the notebook each time.

You could also, of course make your own notebook from scratch. Lifehacker has a how-to guide for creating a DIY notebook perfect for note-taking. Just scale it down.

Attaching Your Pen

Create a DIY Writer's Wallet

Like any writer, you need something to write with. If you always have a pen on you then this is unnecessary. I used another inch of the stretchy band we used for the Magic Wallet and glued it to the notebook's binding to clip the pen on. For the black notebook (above), I simply clipped a small pen (Pilot G-2 mini) to the notebook's stretchy band. I also tried using velcro, but it failed catastrophically.

Anyway, that's everything, let me know what your ideas are. I feel like I've thrown out quite a few.

The author of this post can be contacted at tips@lifehacker.com

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

DIY : Make a Foot Switch for Your DSLR Camera in 5 Minutes [Clever Uses]

Triggering your cameras shutter can cause unwanted shake, and sometimes you need your hand free for other reasons. Here's a look at how to create a foot switch on the cheap in only five minutes. More »

 

 

 

Make a Foot Switch for Your DSLR Camera in 5 MinutesTriggering your cameras shutter can cause unwanted shake, and sometimes you need your hand free for other reasons. Here's a look at how to create a foot switch on the cheap in only five minutes.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

dimanche 16 janvier 2011

DIY : how fun: polaroid iphone deca

from Design*Sponge 

It’s a little on the early side, so my brain is still moving slowly. But I wanted to share this fun little decal sticker that’s been on my mind since last night. Aly sent over a link to this decal she saw on Highsnobiety, and I’m totally hooked. The decal mimics the front of a classic Polaroid camera and turns the back of your iPhone into something (that looks like) much more fun. You can pick up one of the decals at PhotoJojo (love them!) for $6. Perfect as a little “just because” gift for the shutterbug in your life. xo, grace

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

samedi 15 janvier 2011

DIY : Rrrewind is a Wayback Machine for Social Media

Rrrewind is a Wayback Machine for Social MediaRrrewind is your ticket to social media's past, letting you browse the archives of the most popular items posted to sites like delicious, Reddit, YouTube, Hulu, and more.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

jeudi 6 janvier 2011

Graphic Design : STEFAN SAGMEISTER – DESIGN & BONHEUR

Stefan Sagmeister – Design & Bonheur

Stefan Sagmeister est l’un des graphistes les plus originaux de sa génération, questionnant constamment la pratique même du design graphique.
Il évoquera les différents moyens par lesquels un graphiste peut parvenir au bonheur. Comment rester fidèle à sa vocation première et ne pas laisser son travail se réduire à un simple job ? Comment concevoir des projets qui soient source de bonheur pour le public ? Nombre de travaux des deux dernières années seront présentés à cette occasion.

16 décembre 2010, 19h
Centre Pompidou, Paris

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Graphic Design Blog

Graphic design : Websites displaying MASSIVE fonts

from D-Lists 

Websites displaying MASSIVE fonts

There’s very little time when trying to grab people’s attention these days and even less so when trying to get people to stay on your website. An attention grabbing headline can be a great way to quickly get a message across and I’ve created a showcase of websites that deploy HUGE fonts to grab the attention. What do you think of them? Is it a good way to engage the viewer? 

Gratis Zorgverzekering

Gratis Zorgverzekering

Work Work Work

Work Work Work

Damn Good

Damn Good

Teixido

Teixido

Click Media

Click Media

Danstrog

Danstrog

We Are Signals

We Are Signals

Wunderkinder

Wunderkinder

Yaron Schoen

Yaron Schoen

Sarbakan

Sarbakan

Johnny Two Shoes

Johnny Two Shoes

Ben The Bodyguard

Ben The Bodyguard

Adam Butler

Adam Butler

Pound & Grain

Pound & Grain

All Systems Go

All Systems Go

Almighty

Almighty

Linequality

Linequality

Waiter On The Way

Waiter On The Way

Font Deck

Font Deck

Web Effectual

Web Effectual

London Made

London Made

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Graphic Design Blog

mercredi 5 janvier 2011

DIY : Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google) [Video]

You can Google just about anything, but it's not always your best resource for finding the exact answer to what you want. Here's a look at our top ten tools for finding better answe you use? (Besides Lifehacker, of course.) More » 

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)You can Google just about anything, but it's not always your best resource for finding the exact answer to what you want. Here's a look at our top ten tools for finding better answers online.

10. Yahoo! Answers

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
Whether you want to know how babby is formed or have a legitimate question, Yahoo! Answers has a wealth of information. When you ask a question you're bound to get a healthy serving of snark, but you'll generally get a few good (if not great) answers as well. These results are thanks to the popularity of Yahoo! Answers. Even if you don't always get the answer you're looking for, you're pretty much guaranteed a response due to how many people use the service.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Yahoo! Answers

9. Ask Reddit

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
For the more casual and fun questions, you have Ask Reddit. If you're not familiar with Reddit, it's a social news site with a dedicated user base. Those users make Ask Reddit a good tool to get answers, but most of the questions you find tend to fall on the light side of things. You can learn how to cope with putting down your old cat, combat your extreme paranoia, and find out how many people feel Christmas isn't worth it anymore, making the tool more interesting to read when you're bored than the best tool to find the answer you're looking for. In the event you have a question that fits the topics floating around Ask Reddit, however, you'll have plenty of people to join in and answer.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Ask Reddit

8. Duck Duck Go

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
Duck Duck Go is a clever search engine that provides tons of shortcuts to help you find what you're looking for very quickly. The idea is to get you your information without the need to click around too much. Need a color swatch for a particular HEX value? Just enter the HEX value in Duck Duck Go and you'll get it. It can even help you quickly generate a strong, random password. Although search, in general, is pretty fast, Duck Duck Go has a tool set to help you get answers and information as quickly as possible.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Duck Duck Go

7. Wolfram Alpha

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
You can't ask Wolfram Alpha anything, but you can ask it for information you can't find anywhere else. It's full of information and calculations that no other search engine can provide. For example, you can use Wolfram Alpha to calculate activity-specific calorie burn,analyze illness symptoms and generic drug options, and make sense of your confusing family relationships. For more ideas, check out our full Wolfram Alpha coverage, or just play around with it yourself.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Wolfram Alpha

6. Wikipedia

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
You might be thinking, "duh." For that reason it's pretty much impossible to keep Wikipedia off of a Top 10 list about finding better answers online. Wikipedia contains an enormous wealth of information and it ought to be your primary destination when you want quick information on a given topic. While you can't ask it a specific question, if you know what you're looking for you're bound to find it on Wikipedia. It doesn't have an article on everything, but if it did there would be no need for this Top 10.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Wikipedia

5. Blekko

 


While the name is just about charmless, Blekko is a very neat search engine that's quickly growing in popularity. What makes Blekko interesting is a feature it calls slash tag search. For example, if you are looking for a cure for a headache you can just search for that on Google and probably do alright. If you're looking for a cure for a headache but only a homeopathic cure, you can enter "cure for headaches /homeopathy" and that's all you'll get. Slash tag search aim to guarantee that your results will be tailored to categories you specify (via slash tags). It's a really neat way to search and a great way to find answers.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Blekko

4. Quora

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
Our intern Arvin Dang is very fond of Quora, and for good reason. It's a really nice way to get answers, provide answers, and come across answers in your everyday web search. Quora's goal is to use the internet community to build great answer pages on every subject so when you need information it will be the first place you look. While Quora's still new and it has a ways to go before it gets there, it will only get better with time if people keep using it. Quora seems to be frequented by quite a few smart people with thoughtful answers, and hopefully it will only continue to improve.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Quora

3. Ask Metafilter

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
In and of itself, Ask Metafilter is really nothing special. You post a question, people answer it, and it all shows up in one long page of text. There really isn't a user interface to speak of, it's not particularly nice to look at, and there's information everywhere. What's so great about it? The content. First at foremost, content wins. Somehow, Metafilter has managed to create a community that breeds good information. Even if you aren't in search for a particular answer, some of the questions are just so interesting that you can go on reading for hours...or maybe even answer a few.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Ask Metafilter

2. Twitter

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
I was always against Twitter until I started using it and began to realize what a helpful tool it can be to find good information. For Twitter to be effective, you have to have a reasonable number of followers so that when you ask a question there's bound to be a few people who have good answers. Twitter tends to be particularly effective because it isn't just anybody answering a question. Just like you follow people who interest you, or are your friends, or have things in common with you, your followers presumably do the same While I don't have a huge number of followers (feel free to help me change that), I've always gotten good answers when I've asked questions. There are plenty of tools online that are effective at providing you with information, but Twitter helps you get answers from a selection of people that are relevant to you.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Twitter

1. Aardvark

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
Aardvark is one of my favorite answer sites, letting you ask just about any question and receive an answer in under a minute—for free. Aardvark aims to keep the process simple by keeping your questions short and sweet. You ask a question that's about the length of a tweet and you get an answer that isn't much longer from helpers whose interests match that of the question. In return, you're encouraged to answer questions that fall into your area of expertise. Aardvark is possible because of this information exchange and generally works very well, although it did fail to find a good soft-serve ice cream shop in Los Angeles. I guess I'll have to settle for Tasti D-Lite, whenever it finally shows up. But why is Aardvark number one? Because it effectively does the same thing as Twitter, but without the need for a base of followers. It does a fantastic job at matching your question with relevant, helpful people and it does it fast. Even though it couldn't do the impossible and find soft server ice cream in Los Angeles, it's probably the best question and answer service you could ask for.

Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)Aardvark


These are our top ten, but if you're looking for more you should check out how your fellow readers like to ask the internet. Got any great question and answer resources you love that didn't make the list? Let's hear 'em in the comments.


You can contact Adam Dachis, the author of this post, at adachis@lifehacker.com. You can also follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog