dimanche 29 août 2010

Make Your Own Stuffed Crust Pizza [Foodhacks]

Make Your Own Stuffed Crust Pizza

Make Your Own Stuffed Crust Pizza The holy grail of pizza gimmicks, stuffed crust has always been a PIzza Hut specialty. Here's how to make it yourself and surpass the limits of just cheese in the crust.

Atomic Shrimp shows you how in the video above. It seems the how-to for pizza dough has gone missing, so here's an alternative should you need some help making your own.

Send an email to Adam Dachis, the author of this post, at adachis@lifehacker.com.


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What's in Your Awesome Backpacks [Show Us Yours]

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks

What's in Your Awesome BackpacksEarlier this week, we asked you what's in your backpack? You shared, and here are five that we thought were pretty great.

With so many bags we couldn't include them all but aimed for a variety, so be sure to check out the original post to see them all. What were some of the most popular items in your bags? Laptops, phones, MP3 players, flash drives/hard drives, notebooks, writing implements, reading materials, snacks, condoms, and keys—but everyone had their own personal touch, like the following five bags:

The Botswana PhD Field Research Kit

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks

  • Money Belt
  • Passport
  • Voltage Converter
  • Nalgene Bottle
  • Steri-pen UV purification kit (inside the nalgene)
  • USB mouse
  • Airline earphone adapter
  • Watch with paracord wristband
  • Pocket Knife with Swiss Firesteel
  • Lens cloth
  • Book Stand
  • Black Canvas Shaving kit to hold all gadgets (everything here fits in it)
  • Extra usb cables and plug
  • Headphones
  • Mini Powerbar with USB
  • Battery Rechargers
  • Rechargable Batteries
  • Mobile Phone (for African Frequencies)
  • Spare SD card
  • 4 sketch/notebooks
  • USB Keys
  • Audio Recorder
  • 15" Macbook Pro (Not Pictured)
  • Canon Powershot A1100 (Not Pictured)

The Commuter's Essentials

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks
"I have a long-ish train commute to work, so my backpack is a combination of work, play, travel and commuter accessories."

  • Icarus laptop bag from NokHoo - A lot more stylish than my older backpacks and still has space for all my stuff.
  • 15" MacBook Pro (or my work laptop IBM T60p)
  • iPad - Primarily for use with Evernote and the iPad Kindle App, plus a cloth case from Etsy.
  • iPhone To, you know, make and receive phone calls.
  • Microsoft LifeCam VX-5000 primarily for Webex sessions with remote colleagues.
  • Sony retractable headset Great for walking to and from the train and feeding my mild obsession with podcasts. The retractable cable keeps it from getting tangled up in the backpack. Plus, these are the "over the ear" type of headphones. I have a miserable time keeping the ear buds in my ears.
  • Reusable coffee cup because I like coffee and hate styrofoam.
  • Kingston 4 GB DataTraveller USB Thumb Drive - A little small by modern standards, but plenty big enough for copying small files to un-networked computers.
  • Small CD caddy - Handy for keeping around a couple of movies, back up disks. Bought this somewhere in Singapore, but don't think I could find it again if my life depended on it.
  • Retractable network cable - Handy for hotels that don't have WiFi.
  • LiveScribe Pen and Notebook - Really good for drawing off-line. It lets you import it later as a vector drawing from the pen by a USB cable.
  • Comfortable Headset and Microphone - Primarily for use with Dragon Naturally Speaking. Helps avoid wrist/hand pain. Plus there's something kinda cool about putting your arms behind your head, leaning back in your chair and talking to your computer.
  • Umbrella - learned this one the hard way :). I usually keep a nice compact one that fits in the side pocket of the bag.
  • Power brick for laptop and USB cable for iPhone/iPad
  • Hat - For covering my eyes when sleeping on the train.
  • Swiss Army Knife - Classic and still mind-bogglingly useful (not shown).
  • A few plastic shopping bags - These always come in handy for something, usually when I have something wet and/or dirty that I'm not comfortable stuffing in the bag with all my other stuff.
  • Pens - Actually don't use old school pens that often anymore, but they still come in handy once in a while.

The Work Trips and Meetings Survival Bag

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks

  • Thinkpad T400 & charger
  • HTC Hero & charger
  • JBuds J3 earbuds w/ foam tips (nice for noisy airplanes)
  • Belkin Mini surge protector / dual USB charger
  • 16 GB flash drive
  • Spare mini-usb cable
  • Short ethernet cord
  • Notebook, assorted pens
  • Spare change
  • Binder clips
  • Extra contact lenses
  • Glasses & case
  • Screen/glasses cleaning cloth
  • Gum

The Student's Urban Survival Kit

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks
"To give you a rough idea on why I have these items: I'm a student who's cycling to and from uni in rainy England. After uni I often go and explore the city so I get dirty from time to time. It is a beginning for an USK (Urban Survival Kit)."

All in a 55L Karrimor rucksack:

  • Keys
  • Cash
  • Nokia E71 Mobile Phone
  • Food (fruits, sandwiches, snacks, etc.)
  • Water bottle
  • Chewing gum
  • Tissues
  • Cycle Helmet
  • Beanie (because when you cycle in Winter time the wind stings your ears quite badly)
  • Reflector strip wrapping around the ankle
  • Bike pump (sometimes)
  • Super special key
  • Red tail light (3 modes)
  • Petzl head torch (4 modes)
  • Bike repair kit
  • Student and Society IDs
  • Sewing kit (in a plastic box to keep it dry)
  • Carabiner
  • Rain jacket
  • Gloves
  • Knife with holster
  • Whistle
  • Cord
  • Plastic bags
  • Pens, pencils, highlighters, and erasers
  • Study notes
  • MP3 player and headphones
  • 2GB PQI flash drive
  • 120GB hard drive wrapped in kids' socks for protection
  • Dental floss
  • Vaseline
  • Hand cream
  • Toothbrush
  • Artificial teardrops
  • Earplugs

The Art Tech Kit

What's in Your Awesome Backpacks

"First off and most importantly my drawing, sketching, mark making, tagging and painting supplies along with various sketchbooks, loose sheets of paper, printouts and stickers. Next up is a selection of tools this generally changes from day to day. Usually I have my Leatherman and some screwdrivers, but I've been known to carry saws and hammers too.

A really useful addition to my bag is the orange pencil case which is full of USB cables of all descriptions. I usually throw my memory sticks in here too.

My headphones are Skullcandys, which people seem to consider bad, but I love they have a built in MP3 player—which means no wires (plus they look great). I always keep my passport with me for some reason so that goes in the bag too. Last but not least is my laptop. Not pictured here is the camera I used to take this picture (though my mini telescopic tripod is)."

To see more awesome bags and what they hold, check out the original post.

Send an email to Adam Dachis, the author of this post, at adachis@lifehacker.com.


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jeudi 26 août 2010

Use The Hierarchy of Cleaning to Prioritize Chores [Charts]

Use The Hierarchy of Cleaning to Prioritize Chores

Use The Hierarchy of Cleaning to Prioritize ChoresUse The Hierarchy of Cleaning to Prioritize ChoresKeeping a house, or even a modest apartment, in tip-top shape can feel overwhelming. The Hierarchy of Cleaning aims to help you prioritize your cleaning needs.

Small Notebook, a lifestyle simplification and organization blog, has shared a clever hierarchy chart to help you focus on what cleaning tasks are important. Organized in a similar fashion to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, the most basic cleaning requirements are on the bottom. Already took a shower? Good, do some laundry. Laundry in the washer? Worry about the dishes and take out the trash. You can work your way all the way up the hierarchy until your floors are clean and you've started on the extras like deep and detail cleaning.

While you're at it, check out our guide to using procedure checklists for flawless task execution. You'd be amazed how much cleaner your place is when you've got a solid procedure list to guide you through routine cleaning chores.

Visit the link below to download a printable version. Disagree with the ranking on the Hierarchy of Cleaning? Sound off in the comments to tell us how you'd rank things.

Send an email to Jason Fitzpatrick, the author of this post, at jason@lifehacker.com.


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Make Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream Machine [Food Hacks]

Make Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream Machine

Make Ice Cream Without an Ice Cream MachineIf the record heat across the US has you hankering for some ice cream, try your hand at his simple no-machine-required homemade ice cream to cool off this afternoon.

Making ice cream without an ice cream machine doesn't have to be a messy, arduous process. The Kitchn, a culinary-focused blog, offers a detailed guide to making your own ice cream with nothing more than basic kitchen tools and staples like a hand mixer, bowls, cream, eggs, and salt.

Check out the full guide at the link below—you'll find tips, tricks, multiple recipes, and a craving for homemade ice cream. Although their technique is super simple, if you insist on an even simpler method (although perhaps not as full-bodied and flavorful) make sure to check out how to make two-step ice cream here.

Send an email to Jason Fitzpatrick, the author of this post, at jason@lifehacker.com.


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DIY Ultimate Note-Taking Notebook [DIY]

DIY Ultimate Note-Taking Notebook

DSC_2395-bp.jpg

For those of us who are picky about what we write on, finding a quality notebook that meets your specific needs can be tricky. Here's how to make your own personalized, customized notebook.

Photo by sunshinecity.

Instead of making compromises and settling for a Mead or Moleskine notebook, we’re going to make our own notebook: The Ultimate College Notebook. 

Criteria

  • The paper must be of a high quality.
  • The paper must be set up for Cornell Notes. Ed. note: We explained how to take study-worthy lecture notes using the Cornell method in the past.
  • The pages must be perforated and three hole punched.
  • The cover and binding must be made of durable materials.

Step #1: Choose Your Paper

Quality paper is what separates a good notebook from a great notebook. For our Ultimate Notebook we’re using 32lb HP Premium Choice Laser Printer Paper. Although expensive at about $20 a ream, writing on this buttery smooth, fountain pen friendly paper is an absolute dream. The heavy weight of the paper will ensure that ink won’t seep through the page.

Step #2: Print the Lines
DIY Ultimate Note-Taking NotebookThe Cornell Method is a powerful note taking technique which separates a piece of paper into 3 sections; notes, main points and summary. This forces you to consider the big picture when taking notes without getting caught up in the details. We’ll be printing a lined Cornell Note template onto both sides of our pages. You can grab blank, lined or grid PDF templates here. If you prefer plain old lined or grid paper, a quick search should bring up a bunch of line generators. 

Step #3: Perforate and Punch the Pages
photo-21.jpg


Carrying around a notebook with a semester’s worth of notes without some form of redundancy is a scary thought. We’re very diligent when it comes to backing up our computer data, but what about our physical notes? A paper perforator will allow you to tear individual pages out of your notebook so that once you return home you can scan your notes to your computer and file away the originals into a binder.  As a bonus, you can import your scanned notes into a service like Evernote so that you’ll have access to them wherever you go. A 5-in-1 paper trimmer with perforating blade can be bought at Staples for $45. 

Step #4: Assemble
photo-1-bind.jpg


Once you’ve prepped all of our pages for binding, it’s time to bind your notebooks. Head to your favorite print shop and pay the extra few bucks for quality binding materials. Stay away from Cerlox binding, it’s inferior to Coil and Wire-O. 

Step #5: Enjoy
DSC_2395-bp.jpg


The Ultimate College Notebook; quality materials and designed to integrate perfectly into your note processing workflow. You can take pride this semester knowing that you’re writing on the best notebook there is. 

The writers from HackCollege are contributing to our Back To School series all this week.


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Where to Get the Best Free Education Online [Back To School]

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online

Where to Get the Best Free Education OnlineWhether you're a student looking for supplemental learning or you're in the workforce but thirsty for knowledge, you don't have to drop thousands of dollars in tuition to enjoy a top-notch education from some of the best schools in the world.

Computer photo by marcopako; university building photo by J-a-x.

While most online resources won't grant you a college degree, there's a lot more to the internet than Wikipedia when it comes to learning. Whether you learn best through video or text, want to take a year-long course or just to touch up on a few topics, there are more than a few places online that can give you the full experience. In fact, there are enough that it can get quite overwhelming, so we've rounded up the best resources to make it all a bit more manageable. Here are some of the best places to get an education without ever leaving your computer.

Video Courses and Lectures

You won't really notice much of a difference between sitting in front of a screen watching a lecture and sitting in on a lecture in person—apart from the fact that if you do have a burning question, you can't raise your hand to get it answered. These video sites host lectures and full courses from some of the best schools on the planet.

First Stop: The OpenCourseWare Consortium

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
MIT began their OpenCourseWare initiative and published their first batch of courses online in 2002. In 2005, they formed the OpenCourseWare Consortium, which partnered with other universities to bring free education to the masses via the internet. Most courses offered on OpenCourseWare are available as free audio or video lectures for free, and under open licenses. The easiest way to find a course you're interested in is to search the OpenCourseWare Consortium site, which aggregates courses from over 22 universities in the US alone, including MIT, Johns Hopkins, Tufts, and the University of Michigan, and features courses on tons of different subjects, from business and economics to architecture and physics. Most universities have their specialties, of course (MIT, for example, has a bounty of resources in engineering), but between them all, you should be able to find pretty much anything you want. It doesn't include every university participating in the movement—for example, Yale seems strangely absent from the list, despite their open course initiative (which is, of course, yet another option)—but it's more than enough to get you started.

The Khan Academy

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
The Khan Academy is a bit more narrow than the others; as it isn't an aggregator, it's mostly the work of one man, an electronic chalkboard, and YouTube. It focuses mostly on math, from basic arithmetic to calculus, as well as a bit of science. It has a great reputation for teaching them in an understandable manner, though, so if you're in the market for those particular subjects, the Khan Academy is a great place to start (and, of course, it's open source too).

Academic Earth

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online


Previously mentioned Academic Earth aggregates lectures from 19 different universities on a variety of subjects. The idea is similar to that of the OpenCourseWare Consortium, although it's slightly smaller and organized differently—they host all of the material on their site instead of merely linking you to other universities' pages. Its search engine also allows for slightly more specific searching—that is, instead of just searching for courses (such as Calculus II) you can search for a specific topic or class (such as limits). You can also browse by subject, such as Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Literature, or Philosophy and Religion, as well as check out their featured courses and lectures. Each lecture is rated by users of the site, so you know which ones are good sources and which few you might want to steer clear of. Academic Earth also contains some of the universities not listed in the OpenCourseWare Consortium, so while it isn't necessarily better, it is another good resource to broaden your search a bit.

iTunes U

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
The last video resource is the ever-growing iTunes U (accessible through the iTunes Store at the bottom of the front page). If you're an iPod, iPhone, or iPad user, iTunes U is fantastic because you can download these lectures right to your device and take them with you. Furthermore, like Academic Earth, iTunes U allows for searching by specific topic or lecture, not just full courses. It also has a huge database, so if you're searching for something a bit more niche (like a course on American Presidents or Dead Media), you're likely to find it—the only problem is that it can get a bit overwhelming if you just want to browse courses. If you're looking for something more general, you're probably best off going through OpenCourseWare Consortium or Academic Earth, finding the course you want, and then looking it up on iTunes to download to your mobile device. That said, if you're looking to broaden your knowledge beyond the more traditional college courses, spending some time browsing iTunes U might yield some very interesting results.

Text-Based Learning

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online

If you find it easier to learn reading at your own pace (rather than watch a professor drone on in front of you), there are a few sites that provide more text-based learning. In addition, if you find yourself getting lost in one of the above video or audio courses, you may find it easier to reference back to a text source. Unfortunately, probably since it's much easier to just videotape your lectures and put them up on YouTube than it is to write a book, you'll find less selection in this area—but we've still found several sites that can lead you through a number of subjects.

Wikiversity

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
Wikiversity (and its sister site, Wikibooks) is a fantastic resource for all kinds of information. Users can contribute their own projects or research to the wiki, and it hosts a ton of textbook-like resources, organized in a tree—for example, at the top level you have categories such as Humanities, Life Sciences, Mathematics, or Computer Science. Going to the Humanities portal allows you to choose from subjects like Art & Design, Law, and Language, which then breaks down further into specific courses. Courses can provide you with anything from links to a Wikibook for that subject (which is a very well-done online textbook), courses on other sites (including some of the sites mentioned above), and online textbooks from other universities. If you're looking for text-based courses, this is the place to go.

Textbook Revolution

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
We've also mentioned Textbook Revolution before, and it deserves a little more attention. Textbook Revolution's goal is to bring together as many free textbooks on the net as they can. They've got a fairly good database too, which is searchable or browsable by subject (such as Biology, Economics, or Health Sciences) and license. Some of the books are pretty good, but it's a bit of a crapshoot at times—I, for example, only found one statistics book on the site and it left quite a bit to be desired. Other subjects had a few different books of varying quality, so you may find something that works—it's just not the first site I would go to.

Straight from Universities

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online
It's also worth noting that a few other universities offer online textbooks, such as Carnegie Mellon's Open Learning Initiative and the Supplemental Resources section of MIT's aforementioned OpenCourseWare (in fact, while OpenCourseWare focuses on video, they have a ton of other resources like online textbooks, lecture notes, and assignments for many of their classes—especially the aforementioned engineering classes they are known for). There doesn't seem to be a large database of which universities offer this, so you may have to search through universities manually (or see whether your chosen video course comes with an online textbook).

Your Friendly Neighborhood Search Engine

We'd be remiss not to mention that, if all else fails, Google is a great portal to finding other sources and putting together your own education. If you've mastered your search techniques and obscure tricks, you should be able to find pretty much anything you're looking for just by doing an internet-wide search. Again, it isn't the first place I would go—it can get pretty overwhelming—but if you're looking for something really specific or can't find what you're looking for on the above sites, you may be able to find it on Google.

Whether you're a current student looking for extra resources to help you out or you're just looking to expand you're learning, these sites should get you started down the right path. We tried to focus on the best options, but if you've got a favorite site that we didn't mention, share it with us in the comments.

Send an email to Whitson Gordon, the author of this post, at whitson@lifehacker.com.


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