mardi 26 janvier 2010

Prepress : List all fonts used in a PSD file

via Graphic Design Forum and Web Design Forum de libigoogibil le 25/01/10

I was looking for this some time ago, and found it eventually.

Great tool if you need to share PSDs, etc, I've had great use for it. Safe and tested, although I always keep a backup when running scripts just in case.


I attached a zip file to this thread, does that work..?

Attached Files

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Prepress : List all fonts used in a PSD file

via Graphic Design Forum and Web Design Forum de libigoogibil le 25/01/10

I was looking for this some time ago, and found it eventually.

Great tool if you need to share PSDs, etc, I've had great use for it. Safe and tested, although I always keep a backup when running scripts just in case.


I attached a zip file to this thread, does that work..?

Attached Files

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog

Graphic Design : INSERTS


INSERTS
INTERCALER L’ART DANS UN QUOTIDIEN

« Insert » est un anglicisme dont l’usage de plus en plus fréquent a eu raison de nous ; mais il a l’avantage de désigner en un seul mot deux types d’interventions pratiquées par les artistes dans la presse écrite depuis les années soixante : l’encart (papillon, feuillet ou livret indépendant, volant ou agrafé en page centrale mais pouvant être désolidarisé du « porteur »), et l’insertion (ajout d’un élément supplémentaire, encadré ou pleine page, dans un contenu éditorial). Dans les deux cas il s’agit généralement d’un espace publicitaire acheté dans un journal ou une revue (ou offert par eux), utilisé par l’artiste comme un support et un lieu alternatif de son art. L’exposition « Inserts » au Cabinet du livre d’artiste présente en effet des encarts et des insertions d’artistes dans des publications périodiques . . .

Mais la force du mot « insert » vient de son champ sémantique qui, dénotations et connotations confondues, renvoie à ce qui est devenu la hantise des artistes modernes : la réinsertion de l’art dans l’environnement quotidien de l’homme. Réaliser un « insert », c’est introduire l’art dans la vie quotidienne comme on glisse une feuille dans un quotidien, c’est l’immiscer dans l’environnement ambiant comme on incruste un encadré dans la page d’un hebdomadaire, c’est implanter l’art (encore un synonyme d’« insérer » !) dans la périodicité d’un temps ordinaire . . .

jusqu’au 16 mars 2010
Cabinet du livre d’artiste, Université Rennes 2


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Graphic Design Blog

Graphic Design : INSERTS


INSERTS
INTERCALER L’ART DANS UN QUOTIDIEN

« Insert » est un anglicisme dont l’usage de plus en plus fréquent a eu raison de nous ; mais il a l’avantage de désigner en un seul mot deux types d’interventions pratiquées par les artistes dans la presse écrite depuis les années soixante : l’encart (papillon, feuillet ou livret indépendant, volant ou agrafé en page centrale mais pouvant être désolidarisé du « porteur »), et l’insertion (ajout d’un élément supplémentaire, encadré ou pleine page, dans un contenu éditorial). Dans les deux cas il s’agit généralement d’un espace publicitaire acheté dans un journal ou une revue (ou offert par eux), utilisé par l’artiste comme un support et un lieu alternatif de son art. L’exposition « Inserts » au Cabinet du livre d’artiste présente en effet des encarts et des insertions d’artistes dans des publications périodiques . . .

Mais la force du mot « insert » vient de son champ sémantique qui, dénotations et connotations confondues, renvoie à ce qui est devenu la hantise des artistes modernes : la réinsertion de l’art dans l’environnement quotidien de l’homme. Réaliser un « insert », c’est introduire l’art dans la vie quotidienne comme on glisse une feuille dans un quotidien, c’est l’immiscer dans l’environnement ambiant comme on incruste un encadré dans la page d’un hebdomadaire, c’est implanter l’art (encore un synonyme d’« insérer » !) dans la périodicité d’un temps ordinaire . . .

jusqu’au 16 mars 2010
Cabinet du livre d’artiste, Université Rennes 2


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Graphic Design : Sci-fi scenes performed by typography

Graphic Design : Sci-fi scenes performed by typography


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Dernière minute : le groupe d'imprimerie Quad Graphics reprend World Color P...


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog

Dernière minute : le groupe d'imprimerie Quad Graphics reprend World Color P...


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

lundi 25 janvier 2010

OPEN : Creative Commons and open edu...

via Creative Commons » Commons News de Mike Linksvayer le 25/01/10

Creative Commons recently celebrated its seventh anniversary, capping an impressive year of success for the organization, including the launch of CC0, our new public domain tool, migration of Wikipedia to a CC license, and compelling new implementations — from CC-aware discovery in both Google and Yahoo! image search, to adoptions of CC licenses ranging from the U.S. White House to Al Jazeera, and by major educational and scientific institutions to countless individual bloggers, musicians, photographers, teachers, and more. We also surpassed our year end public fundraising goal, raising $533,898 to continue building infrastructure that makes sharing easy, scalable, and legal. Thanks again!

In light of our continued growth and maturation, we are ever mindful of how CC can best ensure that as an organization we continue to increase our impact sustainably. As a provider of critical infrastructure that millions and more depend upon, this is our responsibility. Sustainability is not only or first a financial issue — though we will ask for your continued support in funding the organization — but depends on staying focused on our goals, executing on our strengths and core competencies, constantly looking for ways to streamline operations while empowering our vast international community, and avoiding mission creep however tempting.

Over the last six months we’ve been putting these thoughts into plans and action. Last summer we integrated the team supporting our international affiliates with our core team of experts based in San Francisco, eliminating two of our three Berlin-based staff positions. Over the next several months most of our science team (Science Commons) will move from Boston to San Francisco to align message and operations with our core, also. This month, we are integrating our education team (known heretofore as CC Learn), the subject of the rest of this message.

CC Learn was conceived as a focus point for CC adoption in the education arena. Since its launch two and one half years ago, it has progressed itself into a valuable member of, and broadly engaging with, the open education movement, providing not only legal and technical infrastructure and expertise, but subject matter expertise on a range of issues relevant to open education. Education is one of the most compelling uses of CC legal and technical tools. CC licenses are mission-critical for the development and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) — the ecosystem would fail without standard, interoperable legal terms for sharing, using and reusing content. It relies on collaboration between many institutions and many individuals in many different jurisdictions. Only CC licenses are capable of providing such a bridge.

Yet as much as CC has to offer as a leader of the open education movement, we remain humbled by the many others with yet deeper expertise and experience in these areas and from whom we continue to learn. And while we have much to offer, and will continue to offer as a life-long member of these remarkable movements and communities, we feel compelled to consider our own sustainability. We come back to, as we always have, our irreplaceability on the infrastructure level of providing unparalleled legal and technical excellence that allows education, science, and culture to work — this is what we do uniquely, and this is what we do best. We’ve decided that we can best support the open education and OER communities by focusing our resources and support where we are strongest and provide the most unique value. This means engaging the open education community as legal and technical experts rather than as participants in a broad conversation about the potentialities of open education — which we fully believe in, making the need to support open education in the most leveraged fashion we can all the more compelling.

Such changes mean that some of the activities and, sadly, personnel cannot be integrated successfully with the new structure, consequently transitioning out of CC so that they can better pursue such work elsewhere. In this current transition, Ahrash Bissell, the Executive Director of CC Learn, has left the organization. As with all alumni, CC expects great things of the departing staff and looks forward to ongoing collaboration with Ahrash and the open education community, building on his excellent work. We extend to Ahrash our heartfelt gratitude for his passion, dedication and wisdom, and wish him well with his future endeavors.

In the coming months we’ll be making further announcements about our comprehensive integration of education and science into our core activities and messaging. Exciting developments are on the horizon with respect to new and enhanced legal and technical tools as well as explanatory materials and support for policy development in education and science. More importantly we’ll be asking for your support and input, including specific feedback on designs, prototypes, messages, and initiatives as they develop. Most importantly, we will be asking for your input on whether we’re on the right track. Have something to say about CC? We’re listening!


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from passionfp

OPEN : Creative Commons and open edu...

via Creative Commons » Commons News de Mike Linksvayer le 25/01/10

Creative Commons recently celebrated its seventh anniversary, capping an impressive year of success for the organization, including the launch of CC0, our new public domain tool, migration of Wikipedia to a CC license, and compelling new implementations — from CC-aware discovery in both Google and Yahoo! image search, to adoptions of CC licenses ranging from the U.S. White House to Al Jazeera, and by major educational and scientific institutions to countless individual bloggers, musicians, photographers, teachers, and more. We also surpassed our year end public fundraising goal, raising $533,898 to continue building infrastructure that makes sharing easy, scalable, and legal. Thanks again!

In light of our continued growth and maturation, we are ever mindful of how CC can best ensure that as an organization we continue to increase our impact sustainably. As a provider of critical infrastructure that millions and more depend upon, this is our responsibility. Sustainability is not only or first a financial issue — though we will ask for your continued support in funding the organization — but depends on staying focused on our goals, executing on our strengths and core competencies, constantly looking for ways to streamline operations while empowering our vast international community, and avoiding mission creep however tempting.

Over the last six months we’ve been putting these thoughts into plans and action. Last summer we integrated the team supporting our international affiliates with our core team of experts based in San Francisco, eliminating two of our three Berlin-based staff positions. Over the next several months most of our science team (Science Commons) will move from Boston to San Francisco to align message and operations with our core, also. This month, we are integrating our education team (known heretofore as CC Learn), the subject of the rest of this message.

CC Learn was conceived as a focus point for CC adoption in the education arena. Since its launch two and one half years ago, it has progressed itself into a valuable member of, and broadly engaging with, the open education movement, providing not only legal and technical infrastructure and expertise, but subject matter expertise on a range of issues relevant to open education. Education is one of the most compelling uses of CC legal and technical tools. CC licenses are mission-critical for the development and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) — the ecosystem would fail without standard, interoperable legal terms for sharing, using and reusing content. It relies on collaboration between many institutions and many individuals in many different jurisdictions. Only CC licenses are capable of providing such a bridge.

Yet as much as CC has to offer as a leader of the open education movement, we remain humbled by the many others with yet deeper expertise and experience in these areas and from whom we continue to learn. And while we have much to offer, and will continue to offer as a life-long member of these remarkable movements and communities, we feel compelled to consider our own sustainability. We come back to, as we always have, our irreplaceability on the infrastructure level of providing unparalleled legal and technical excellence that allows education, science, and culture to work — this is what we do uniquely, and this is what we do best. We’ve decided that we can best support the open education and OER communities by focusing our resources and support where we are strongest and provide the most unique value. This means engaging the open education community as legal and technical experts rather than as participants in a broad conversation about the potentialities of open education — which we fully believe in, making the need to support open education in the most leveraged fashion we can all the more compelling.

Such changes mean that some of the activities and, sadly, personnel cannot be integrated successfully with the new structure, consequently transitioning out of CC so that they can better pursue such work elsewhere. In this current transition, Ahrash Bissell, the Executive Director of CC Learn, has left the organization. As with all alumni, CC expects great things of the departing staff and looks forward to ongoing collaboration with Ahrash and the open education community, building on his excellent work. We extend to Ahrash our heartfelt gratitude for his passion, dedication and wisdom, and wish him well with his future endeavors.

In the coming months we’ll be making further announcements about our comprehensive integration of education and science into our core activities and messaging. Exciting developments are on the horizon with respect to new and enhanced legal and technical tools as well as explanatory materials and support for policy development in education and science. More importantly we’ll be asking for your support and input, including specific feedback on designs, prototypes, messages, and initiatives as they develop. Most importantly, we will be asking for your input on whether we’re on the right track. Have something to say about CC? We’re listening!


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

OPEN : Creative Commons and open edu...

via Creative Commons » Commons News de Mike Linksvayer le 25/01/10

Creative Commons recently celebrated its seventh anniversary, capping an impressive year of success for the organization, including the launch of CC0, our new public domain tool, migration of Wikipedia to a CC license, and compelling new implementations — from CC-aware discovery in both Google and Yahoo! image search, to adoptions of CC licenses ranging from the U.S. White House to Al Jazeera, and by major educational and scientific institutions to countless individual bloggers, musicians, photographers, teachers, and more. We also surpassed our year end public fundraising goal, raising $533,898 to continue building infrastructure that makes sharing easy, scalable, and legal. Thanks again!

In light of our continued growth and maturation, we are ever mindful of how CC can best ensure that as an organization we continue to increase our impact sustainably. As a provider of critical infrastructure that millions and more depend upon, this is our responsibility. Sustainability is not only or first a financial issue — though we will ask for your continued support in funding the organization — but depends on staying focused on our goals, executing on our strengths and core competencies, constantly looking for ways to streamline operations while empowering our vast international community, and avoiding mission creep however tempting.

Over the last six months we’ve been putting these thoughts into plans and action. Last summer we integrated the team supporting our international affiliates with our core team of experts based in San Francisco, eliminating two of our three Berlin-based staff positions. Over the next several months most of our science team (Science Commons) will move from Boston to San Francisco to align message and operations with our core, also. This month, we are integrating our education team (known heretofore as CC Learn), the subject of the rest of this message.

CC Learn was conceived as a focus point for CC adoption in the education arena. Since its launch two and one half years ago, it has progressed itself into a valuable member of, and broadly engaging with, the open education movement, providing not only legal and technical infrastructure and expertise, but subject matter expertise on a range of issues relevant to open education. Education is one of the most compelling uses of CC legal and technical tools. CC licenses are mission-critical for the development and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) — the ecosystem would fail without standard, interoperable legal terms for sharing, using and reusing content. It relies on collaboration between many institutions and many individuals in many different jurisdictions. Only CC licenses are capable of providing such a bridge.

Yet as much as CC has to offer as a leader of the open education movement, we remain humbled by the many others with yet deeper expertise and experience in these areas and from whom we continue to learn. And while we have much to offer, and will continue to offer as a life-long member of these remarkable movements and communities, we feel compelled to consider our own sustainability. We come back to, as we always have, our irreplaceability on the infrastructure level of providing unparalleled legal and technical excellence that allows education, science, and culture to work — this is what we do uniquely, and this is what we do best. We’ve decided that we can best support the open education and OER communities by focusing our resources and support where we are strongest and provide the most unique value. This means engaging the open education community as legal and technical experts rather than as participants in a broad conversation about the potentialities of open education — which we fully believe in, making the need to support open education in the most leveraged fashion we can all the more compelling.

Such changes mean that some of the activities and, sadly, personnel cannot be integrated successfully with the new structure, consequently transitioning out of CC so that they can better pursue such work elsewhere. In this current transition, Ahrash Bissell, the Executive Director of CC Learn, has left the organization. As with all alumni, CC expects great things of the departing staff and looks forward to ongoing collaboration with Ahrash and the open education community, building on his excellent work. We extend to Ahrash our heartfelt gratitude for his passion, dedication and wisdom, and wish him well with his future endeavors.

In the coming months we’ll be making further announcements about our comprehensive integration of education and science into our core activities and messaging. Exciting developments are on the horizon with respect to new and enhanced legal and technical tools as well as explanatory materials and support for policy development in education and science. More importantly we’ll be asking for your support and input, including specific feedback on designs, prototypes, messages, and initiatives as they develop. Most importantly, we will be asking for your input on whether we’re on the right track. Have something to say about CC? We’re listening!


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Open Source Blog

Astronautique : This Week in Space for Canada

via SpaceRef Canada de Chuck Black le 22/01/10

This week in space for Canada is quiet but important and all about the boring programs available to help Canadian business making a living off our final frontier.

After all, businesses operating space related ventures have been commercially viable since at least the 1960's when the first Early Bird satellite was successfully launched into geosynchronous orbit according to David M. Livingston in his paper, Space: The Final Financial Frontier.

And Canadian companies have always been leaders in this area, beginning with the launch of the Allouette and Anik satellites and moving forward from there.

In fact, it's got to the point where Cabinet Minister Jim Prentice has gone so far as to say that "Canada has more than 200 firms that are involved in space" employing thousands of skilled workers who know that "working in space or working in the space-based industries is just another career option."

Canadian Space Agency (CSA) reports (like their 2008 State of the Canadian Space Sector) generally reinforce the perception that space is the place for opportunity, high growth and profitable returns on investment.

The big question now is the type of support the Canadian government intends to provide to help incubate, develop and grow our existing Canadian space focused firms like Telesat, MDA and Comdev and also the many new firms moving into this space to take advantage of opportunities. This is especially timely given the release of the recent CSA report from the 6th Canadian Space Exploration Workshop which outlines ten new directions for Canadian focused space activities as described in the article Canadian Space Agency Releases Report from the 6th Canadian Space Exploration Workshop.

At present, there are a number of CSA funding programs available for start-up and established companies. They include:

1. The Earth Observation Applications and Utilization (EOAU) Program, which is an umbrella designation for a number of programs through which companies can obtain support. For example, one component of the EOAU program, the Earth Observation Application Development Program (EOADP) funds projects that are exclusively for industry led initiatives.

2. The Space Technologies Development Program (STDP), which supports the development of technologies for the enhancement of industrial capabilities.

3. The Satellite Communications Program, which supports the development of advanced satellite communications technologies and international services.

4. The Partnerships Support Program, which is directed to universities, but does include the funded participation of industrial partners.

5. The various Canada - ESA Programs, which allows Canadian companies to participate in ESA led initiatives offset with CSA funding.

However, according to a publication titled: Small Aerospace Companies: Space Activities in North America and Europe written by investment bank Near Earth LLC, Canada could be doing much more to assist Canadian based firms.

According to the report, when compared to organizations like the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and others, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has "no dedicated programs for small business."

Near Earth LLC. does list a number of interesting small business focused programs that the CSA might want to take a look at including the NASA Mentor-Protégé Program, the Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) and IPP seed fund program, the NASA Centenial Challenges program, the NOAA SBIR research grants, the ESA Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) Initiative and quite a few others.

Those with an interest in this area might also want to check out my article Canadian Space Agency Provides "No Dedicated Programs" to Support Small Aerospace Firms which goes into these programs in a little more detail.

So how do Canadian space focused small businesses feel about this state of affairs and what can be done about it? That is something we'll be discussed next week in space for Canada.

---
Chuck Black is the Secretary of the Canadian Space Commerce Association, a member of the Canadian Space Society, active in the International Association of Space Entrepeneurs and looking for the next big opportunity to make a little money off the high frontier. I live in Toronto, Ontario and can be reached at mr.chuck.black < at > gmail.com.


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Phoenix reste muette

via Les actualités de Ciel & Espace de redaction le 25/01/10

25/01/2010
La sonde Phoenix, posée près du pôle nord de Mars, et qui avait terminé sa mission en novembre 2008, par manque d'énergie solaire, n'émet aucun signal. Tel est le résultat des premières écoutes menées avec la sonde Mars Odyssey pendant une semaine. Même si les chances que Phoenix ait survécu à la nuit polaire martienne sont infimes, deux autres tentatives d'écoute auront lieu en février et mars prochains....

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Astronomy and Astronautic blog

Phoenix reste muette

via Les actualités de Ciel & Espace de redaction le 25/01/10

25/01/2010
La sonde Phoenix, posée près du pôle nord de Mars, et qui avait terminé sa mission en novembre 2008, par manque d'énergie solaire, n'émet aucun signal. Tel est le résultat des premières écoutes menées avec la sonde Mars Odyssey pendant une semaine. Même si les chances que Phoenix ait survécu à la nuit polaire martienne sont infimes, deux autres tentatives d'écoute auront lieu en février et mars prochains....

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

ST : The Monster Times Trek Special #1: continued

via My Star Trek Scrapbook de Frederick le 25/01/10

The old collection cabinet doors swing open this time to present more material from "The Monster Times" Star Trek special, published in 1973. I recently posted the first article from it here: ST special #1 post and now I'm bringing you some more. Aren't I just the nicest person you know?
(Click on images to view larger.)

It's interesting to read that even as far back as 1973 that Trek was being considered as a movie, and that Gene was wanting to out-do "2001: A Space Odyssey," a goal he apparently held onto even into the late 70's when he finally made the movie... without taking into account the need for some action as demonstrated by the success of Star Wars. Heaven knows ST:TMP could have used some.


Below, from the same issue, another of the trivia question articles, "So You Think You Know Star Trek?" Well, do ya... punk? Do you feel lucky? Then see if you can answer most of them right!



Below, two more of the colorized black and white pinups from the magazine. Since the magazine only used two colors per issue, any photos that were color were done using as many mixtures of the two shades as they could come up with.


"William Shatner, beware my sword!"


Of course this one was my favorite.

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

ST : The Monster Times Trek Special #1: continued

via My Star Trek Scrapbook de Frederick le 25/01/10

The old collection cabinet doors swing open this time to present more material from "The Monster Times" Star Trek special, published in 1973. I recently posted the first article from it here: ST special #1 post and now I'm bringing you some more. Aren't I just the nicest person you know?
(Click on images to view larger.)

It's interesting to read that even as far back as 1973 that Trek was being considered as a movie, and that Gene was wanting to out-do "2001: A Space Odyssey," a goal he apparently held onto even into the late 70's when he finally made the movie... without taking into account the need for some action as demonstrated by the success of Star Wars. Heaven knows ST:TMP could have used some.


Below, from the same issue, another of the trivia question articles, "So You Think You Know Star Trek?" Well, do ya... punk? Do you feel lucky? Then see if you can answer most of them right!



Below, two more of the colorized black and white pinups from the magazine. Since the magazine only used two colors per issue, any photos that were color were done using as many mixtures of the two shades as they could come up with.


"William Shatner, beware my sword!"


Of course this one was my favorite.

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Star Trek

DIY : monday diy special: kate’s menu binder

Regarde ça un cartable pour les menus de restos... il est super beau

via Design*Sponge de grace le 25/01/10


[hi guys! i'm so sorry for the delay on kate's project. my blogging schedule got all mixed up when i was in salt lake so we're going to post kate's project from last week today, as a special monday diy treat]

hey everyone! i am back with another organization helper for your kitchen (and your tummies). this one might be a little controversial (who has the time to do this?! isn’t this a little too organized?). but i must tell you from experience that when we have people over and decide to order out, they are genuinely mega-impressed with this organized little binder. plus, every time we flip through it, saving ourselves from rummaging through a drawer of papers to seek out the elusive pizza menu, our stress level decreases. trust me, it’s worth the effort to make this binder if you get take-out with any regularity. if you don’t order out very much, i salute you and your cooking skills, and i also encourage you to use this method to store online recipes or those clipped from magazines, which also have a knack for crowding our drawers, getting lost, and making us feel messy! i hope this project is of use to some of you. have fun! – kate

CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump!


materials:

1. three ring binder
2. clear binder storage sheets (these come in packs at office supply stores)
3. tab divider (you can also make these from manila folders or card stock)
4. notepad
5. hot glue
6. envelope
7. folder (or piece of card stock)
8. sewing machine (for fabric binder cover, optional)
9. inkjet transfer sheet (for binder cover, optional)
10. canvas (for binder covering, optional)

cost:

1. binder $2
2. clear sheets $5
3. canvas $2
4. inkjet trasnfer paper $10 (for five sheets)

time:

1 hour (including time to make cover)

instructions:

for binder:

1. place all your menus in clear protective sheets and sort by any means you like: proximity, cuisine type, price, etc.

2. write categories on divider tabs and organize all sheets into binder.

3. take a folder or a piece of card stock and punch holes to fit in binder. take the cover off the notepad and glue the back of the notepad to the folder. this is for taking orders!

4. glue the back of the envelope to the folder as well. this is for your eating out receipts so you can keep track of your spending.

5. place the folder at the front of the binder.

for the binder cover:

1. lay your binder out on a piece of canvas and trace the outline.

2. cut the canvas to have a 1.25″ hem on the top and bottom edges of the binder outline, and a 5″ allowance on the left and right sides.

3. fold the canvas 1″ down at the top and bottom and sew them. then fold the 5″ allowances in and sew them at the very bottom and top of the folds. this creates sleeves for the binder cover and back to slide into.

4. print out your design on transfer paper (you have to print in mirror image so when you iron it on it will be facing the right way) and iron it onto the fabric according to the transfer paper instructions.

5. peel off the transfer backing to reveal the image, then slide the binder into the cover sleeves.

YOU’RE DONE!!


Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

DIY : monday diy special: kate’s menu binder

Regarde ça un cartable pour les menus de restos... il est super beau

via Design*Sponge de grace le 25/01/10


[hi guys! i'm so sorry for the delay on kate's project. my blogging schedule got all mixed up when i was in salt lake so we're going to post kate's project from last week today, as a special monday diy treat]

hey everyone! i am back with another organization helper for your kitchen (and your tummies). this one might be a little controversial (who has the time to do this?! isn’t this a little too organized?). but i must tell you from experience that when we have people over and decide to order out, they are genuinely mega-impressed with this organized little binder. plus, every time we flip through it, saving ourselves from rummaging through a drawer of papers to seek out the elusive pizza menu, our stress level decreases. trust me, it’s worth the effort to make this binder if you get take-out with any regularity. if you don’t order out very much, i salute you and your cooking skills, and i also encourage you to use this method to store online recipes or those clipped from magazines, which also have a knack for crowding our drawers, getting lost, and making us feel messy! i hope this project is of use to some of you. have fun! – kate

CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump!


materials:

1. three ring binder
2. clear binder storage sheets (these come in packs at office supply stores)
3. tab divider (you can also make these from manila folders or card stock)
4. notepad
5. hot glue
6. envelope
7. folder (or piece of card stock)
8. sewing machine (for fabric binder cover, optional)
9. inkjet transfer sheet (for binder cover, optional)
10. canvas (for binder covering, optional)

cost:

1. binder $2
2. clear sheets $5
3. canvas $2
4. inkjet trasnfer paper $10 (for five sheets)

time:

1 hour (including time to make cover)

instructions:

for binder:

1. place all your menus in clear protective sheets and sort by any means you like: proximity, cuisine type, price, etc.

2. write categories on divider tabs and organize all sheets into binder.

3. take a folder or a piece of card stock and punch holes to fit in binder. take the cover off the notepad and glue the back of the notepad to the folder. this is for taking orders!

4. glue the back of the envelope to the folder as well. this is for your eating out receipts so you can keep track of your spending.

5. place the folder at the front of the binder.

for the binder cover:

1. lay your binder out on a piece of canvas and trace the outline.

2. cut the canvas to have a 1.25″ hem on the top and bottom edges of the binder outline, and a 5″ allowance on the left and right sides.

3. fold the canvas 1″ down at the top and bottom and sew them. then fold the 5″ allowances in and sew them at the very bottom and top of the folds. this creates sleeves for the binder cover and back to slide into.

4. print out your design on transfer paper (you have to print in mirror image so when you iron it on it will be facing the right way) and iron it onto the fabric according to the transfer paper instructions.

5. peel off the transfer backing to reveal the image, then slide the binder into the cover sleeves.

YOU’RE DONE!!


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Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

NASA Tweetup Gives Public Birds-Eye View Of Space Shuttle Mission

via NASA Breaking News le 21/01/10

For the first time, NASA Twitter followers can personally go inside the heart of a space shuttle mission at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

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FP : Élaborer une situation de travail artificielle

via Didactique professionnelle de Henri Boudreault le 23/01/10

Dans un article précédent (La situation didactique en formation professionnelle) je présentais la raison d’être de la situation de travail artificielle, mais je ne décrivais pas sa réalisation. Je vous présente ici un aide à la tâche pour élabore ce genre de situation. L’intérêt est de placer une trame de fond professionnelle qui pourra servir [...]

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FP : Élaborer une situation de travail artificielle

via Didactique professionnelle de Henri Boudreault le 23/01/10

Dans un article précédent (La situation didactique en formation professionnelle) je présentais la raison d’être de la situation de travail artificielle, mais je ne décrivais pas sa réalisation. Je vous présente ici un aide à la tâche pour élabore ce genre de situation. L’intérêt est de placer une trame de fond professionnelle qui pourra servir [...]

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Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Food : Latkes | Potato Pancakes


This is a recipe for easy potato pancakes. Latkes or Jewish potato pancakes, are an easy, tasty treat. With a few simple ingredients you can make potato latkes in no time.

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Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Food

Food : Latkes | Potato Pancakes


This is a recipe for easy potato pancakes. Latkes or Jewish potato pancakes, are an easy, tasty treat. With a few simple ingredients you can make potato latkes in no time.

Ce que vous pouvez faire à partir de cette page :

Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Prepress : What Makes for a Good Print Blog?

via Prepress Pilgrim de admin le 24/01/10

M-bossed did a blog listing his top 10 print blogs. There are some familiar ones there, like Gordon's Quality in Print, and the group bloggers at PrintCEO. There are also some  print blogs I've never read before, like the dieline, a blog for the packaging printers (the pictures are gorgeous, by the way).

There was also a mention of  the tough love for xerox blog, which I've peeked at every once in awhile. I don't follow it that much because he does talk mostly about (guess) Xerox and while Xerox is my favorite digital printer, I'm not obsessed with it. On the other hand, Michael (the tlfx owner) is getting into Twitter a bit and its fun to watch that.

There are two blogs that should have been on my list but weren't (in my opinion, of course). One is the venerable and authoritative Prepressure and the second is Poor Richard wordpress blog. I'm suspecting that Laurens of PP got bumped the list because he has prepress in his URL?

But I'm not surprised that Poor Richard is left off the list since the guy writes beautiful essays but never links to other printing blogs so nobody knows about him. I know that smacks of cronyism but hey, I don't spend all day searching Google for other blogs that write about printing and prepress. I usually find out about blogs in one of two way: 1) They link to a story of mine and I get a pingback (notification somebody linked to me) or 2) I'm reading a familiar blog and hey, they mention a blog I've never heard of before. Let me be blunt on this: If you don't do the linky-link with other blogs of your ilk, you're not going to get the traffic in the long run, unless you bang out beautiful essay day after day. And that's hard.

However, I don't think Poor Richard gives a bleep anyways, as he is too busy running a real live print shop, as opposed to Prepress Pilgrim who spent way too much last week trying to configure a virtual private server for an upcoming client site migration.

And try as I might, there was no way I was going to make a semi-interesting blog post out of THAT adventure, hence this blog post must suffice.


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Posted via email from Steve's posterous

Prepress : What Makes for a Good Print Blog?

via Prepress Pilgrim de admin le 24/01/10

M-bossed did a blog listing his top 10 print blogs. There are some familiar ones there, like Gordon's Quality in Print, and the group bloggers at PrintCEO. There are also some  print blogs I've never read before, like the dieline, a blog for the packaging printers (the pictures are gorgeous, by the way).

There was also a mention of  the tough love for xerox blog, which I've peeked at every once in awhile. I don't follow it that much because he does talk mostly about (guess) Xerox and while Xerox is my favorite digital printer, I'm not obsessed with it. On the other hand, Michael (the tlfx owner) is getting into Twitter a bit and its fun to watch that.

There are two blogs that should have been on my list but weren't (in my opinion, of course). One is the venerable and authoritative Prepressure and the second is Poor Richard wordpress blog. I'm suspecting that Laurens of PP got bumped the list because he has prepress in his URL?

But I'm not surprised that Poor Richard is left off the list since the guy writes beautiful essays but never links to other printing blogs so nobody knows about him. I know that smacks of cronyism but hey, I don't spend all day searching Google for other blogs that write about printing and prepress. I usually find out about blogs in one of two way: 1) They link to a story of mine and I get a pingback (notification somebody linked to me) or 2) I'm reading a familiar blog and hey, they mention a blog I've never heard of before. Let me be blunt on this: If you don't do the linky-link with other blogs of your ilk, you're not going to get the traffic in the long run, unless you bang out beautiful essay day after day. And that's hard.

However, I don't think Poor Richard gives a bleep anyways, as he is too busy running a real live print shop, as opposed to Prepress Pilgrim who spent way too much last week trying to configure a virtual private server for an upcoming client site migration.

And try as I might, there was no way I was going to make a semi-interesting blog post out of THAT adventure, hence this blog post must suffice.


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Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog

70 % des imprimeurs entendent sortir de la récession par l'innovation

via France graphique de la Rédaction le 25/01/10

C'est le principal enseignement à tirer du deuxième sondage économique réalisé par la FESPA, fédération d'associations professionnelles d'imprimeurs et de sérigraphes. 70,2 % des imprimeurs ayant répondu à ce sondage comptent sur l'introduction de nouveaux produits ou process dans leur activité pour sortir de la mauvaise passe que constitue la crise économique actuelle. Dans le même temps, 61,5 % ont ajouté de nouveaux produits à leur offre et 60,6 % s'appliquent à pénétrer de nouveaux marchés. (...) - Profession /

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Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog

70 % des imprimeurs entendent sortir de la récession par l'innovation

via France graphique de la Rédaction le 25/01/10

C'est le principal enseignement à tirer du deuxième sondage économique réalisé par la FESPA, fédération d'associations professionnelles d'imprimeurs et de sérigraphes. 70,2 % des imprimeurs ayant répondu à ce sondage comptent sur l'introduction de nouveaux produits ou process dans leur activité pour sortir de la mauvaise passe que constitue la crise économique actuelle. Dans le même temps, 61,5 % ont ajouté de nouveaux produits à leur offre et 60,6 % s'appliquent à pénétrer de nouveaux marchés. (...) - Profession /

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Cadet : Top 5 Survival Shelter Videos

via HowStuffWorks Daily Feed le 25/01/10

In a survival situation, one of your most important tasks is to build a shelter. A decent shelter will not only help protect you from the weather but also help you stay positive. See how the pros deal with the challenge of finding shelter in the wild, all over the world.

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Posted via email from Steve's posterous