lundi 20 décembre 2010

Graphique Design : "The Ten Commandments of George Lois." from TypographyShop

"The Ten Commandments of George Lois." from TypographyShop

My outfit TypographyShop just released the second in our series "The Ten Commandments of George Lois." The quotation reads "The creative act, the defeat of habit by originality, overcomes everything." When I first approached George about collaborating, this was his immediate suggestion. My favorite quote of his, "Great ideas can't be tested. Only mediocre ideas can be tested" was the first release in the series. 

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Graphic Design Blog

Prepress : Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced - Free Video Clips

Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced - Free Video Clips

In Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced, author and industry expert Deke McClelland teaches how to take advantage of the wide array of dynamic features in Illustrator CS5. This course demonstrates how to apply these features to paths, groups, and editable text to create professional-quality artwork. The course covers Live Trace, Live Paint, and Live Color, as well as symbols, gradients, exporting, and integration with Photoshop. Exercise files accompany the course. You can go to the series page and view some free video clips from this training. Below is a list of the available free clips: Tracing an imported image Tracing options: The raster functions Sketching and drawing for Illustrator Creating a radial gradient Blending between levels of opacity Rotating objects in 3D space Making a symmetrical modification Stroking with the Live Paint Bucket tool Building a classic Celtic knot Creating a basic bevel effect Applying a "path wiggler" to type Introducing the Color Guide panel Enabling CS's new 9-slice scaling Applying a basic "local" color adjustment Two ways to place a pixel-based image Real-world blending modes Exporting transparency from Illustrator (posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prepress : Creating Mixed Page Orientations in the Same Layout

Creating Mixed Page Orientations in the Same Layout

There are two ways to create mixed page sizes in InDesign CS5, but only one lets you change individual page orientations, too.

Creating Mixed Page Orientations in the Same Layout

A newly-upgraded InDesign CS5 user, Nick, asked me the following question:

“How do I change the orientation of a new custom page size I add? I’m trying to make a tabloid-sized fold-out page. I have a facing-page letter-size document, and I used the dropdown menu in the Pages panel to add the tabloid page, but it’s portrait like the rest of the document. I can’t find the control where I can change the orientation of the new tabloid page to landscape.”

 

In other words, Nick’s spread looked like this:

But he wanted it to look like this:

The problem is that InDesign CS5 has two ways to change a page size (at least), and Nick was using the easy, shortcut way — who wouldn’t? Just select a page thumbnail in the Pages panel, as page 7 is selected below, and then choose a page size from the Edit Page Size button, circled in red:

That changes the size of the selected page(s) but the orientation and position of the master page items is not changed.

The slightly more complicated way to change a page size — using the new Page tool — gives you many more options, including control over page orientation.  Even if you would never think of mixing page sizes in the same document, you can still use the Page tool to change just the orientation of one or more of your existing pages, which could come in mighty handy!

To change the orientation of the page he added, I told Nick to click on the page (in the panel or right on the layout) with the Page tool, the third tool down from the top of the Tools panel. That puts InDesign into “Page Size Edit” mode, and so a phalanx of Page Size editing tools appears in the Control bar. There you’ll find two buttons controlling orientation (circled in red below). Click the Landscape button to change the page to that orientation.

Best of Both Worlds: Create a Custom Page Size

I asked Nick if he’d ever be using this kind of page again … a tabloid landscape page … in his work, and he said yes, quite a bit! He works for an architectural design firm, assisting the engineers in putting together proposals. And you know how those engineers love those fold-outs. ;-)

So I suggested that before he leaves Page Size Edit mode (by choosing any other tool) he take a moment and create a new Custom Page Size for this type of page. That way, he can just select it from the Edit Page Size dropdown menu at the bottom of the Pages panel (the “easy” way), and the custom orientation comes along for the ride!

It’s as simple as creating a new style or workspace. While you’re in Page Editing mode (with the Page tool selected), and you’ve got your selected page looking just right, choose Custom Page Size, the last item in the Page Size preset dropdown menu in the Control panel:

Name the new preset in the Custom Page Size dialog box and click the Add button, then click OK to save your changes.

To use the preset, just do as Nick did in the beginning. Select a page in the Pages panel, and click the Edit Page Size button at the bottom of the panel to reveal the default page sizes. Your custom ones will appear at the top of the list:

Custom page sizes are saved, by the way, in a Page Sizes folder in the InDesign settings folder, the same location that InDesign saves custom Workspaces, Keyboard Shortcut Sets, and saved Find/Change queries. So they’re available with every document from then on, and you don’t have to worry about them being deleted when you rebuild InDesign preferences, should you ever need to do that.

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prépresse : Livre : Travaux pratiques avec InDesign

Livre : Travaux pratiques avec InDesign

Cet ouvrage tout en couleurs est un recueil de travaux pratiques qui permettra aux utilisateurs débutants de découvrir InDesign à travers différents exemples concrets de mise en pages.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Livre : Le disque aux 800 couleurs

Livre : Le disque aux 800 couleurs

 

Le choix des couleurs dans une maison s'avère souvent difficile. Combien de fois nous sommes nous rabattus sur des "blancs cassés" ou des "beiges" par peur d'avoir des couleurs trop criardes ? Mais comment être sûr de ses choix lorsqu'on ne possède pas déformation particulière ?

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prepress : Synch up the Mini Bridge and Bridge content panel

Synch up the Mini Bridge and Bridge content panel

Here's how to make Mini Bridge and Bridge work together a little better!

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prepress : Bittbox Contest - Free Brushes, Fonts, Vector Illustration

Bittbox Contest - Free Brushes, Fonts, Vector Illustrations

Here's the scoop from Bittbox: Our friends at Designious.com have just released their Design Cocktail Bundle 3, and I have 10 bundles to give away! The bundle includes 5 Mega Vector Packs, 20 Packs of Photoshop Brushes, 3D Sketch Font, Set of 1000 vector illustrations, as well as several HTML templates, a WordPress theme, and some T-Shirt Templates. An overall value of $904, for $29, but now is your chance to grab it for free. Be sure to read the rules, and good luck :) Visit Bittbox to enter... (posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)

Bittbox Contest - Free Brushes, Fonts, Vector Illustrations
December 13, 2010

Bittbox Contest - Free Brushes, Fonts, Vector IllustrationsHere's the scoop from Bittbox: Our friends at Designious.com have just released their Design Cocktail Bundle 3, and I have 10 bundles to give away! The bundle includes 5 Mega Vector Packs, 20 Packs of Photoshop Brushes, 3D Sketch Font, Set of 1000 vector illustrations, as well as several HTML templates, a WordPress theme, and some T-Shirt Templates. An overall value of $904, for $29, but now is your chance to grab it for free. Be sure to read the rules, and good luck :) Visit Bittbox to enter.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog

Prepress : InDesign CS5’s new Bounding Box

InDesign CS5’s new Bounding Box

Don't overlook CS5's incredibly useful Transformation Bounding Box!

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prépresse : QR Code & Flashcode, de nouveaux outils marketing très prometteurs

QR Code & Flashcode, de nouveaux outils marketing très prometteurs

 

Mis au point dans les années 1980 aux Etats-Unis, les codes Datamatrix sont les premiers codes 2D à avoir vu le jour. Dans le domaine de l'emballage, le groupe Stratus Packaging s'en est fait une spécialité.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prepress : Exporting and Importing HTML with InDesign

Exporting and Importing HTML with InDesign

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prépresse : Caler des presses offset aux normes ISO 12647 avec simple spectrophotomètre désormais possible

Prepress : Adobe Photoshop 12.0.2 Update Now Available For Download

Adobe Photoshop 12.0.2 Update Now Available For Download
from The Photoshop Blog

The Adobe Photoshop 12.0.2 update for Mac and the Adobe Photoshop 12.0.2 update for Windows are now available for download. The Adobe Photoshop 12.0.2 update fixes a number of high priority bugs including painting performance and type-related issues... (posted by Jennifer Apple for www.PhotoshopSupport.com)

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

Prepress : Deluxe Holiday Lights

http://indesignsecrets.com/deluxe-holiday-lights.php

from InDesignSecrets 

It's time to celebrate the season by lighting up a document with InDesign CS5.

 

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme Prepress Blog Collage

dimanche 19 décembre 2010

DIY : How to Back Up Your Tumblr [Downloads]

How to Back Up Your Tumblr

How to Back Up Your TumblrIf you're a Tumblr user, you probably noticed the massive outage it endured this weekend, and you're probably having one of those "what if I'd lost everything" moments. Here's how to back up your Tumblr to save yourself from such distress.

We don't talk about Tumblr a ton around here, but the sheer mass of this week's outage probably left a lot of people thinking—not only about their Tumblr, but other blogs and social networks in the process. Sometimes things go down, and while often it's only for a short while and your data isn't lost, it's important to be prepared for the worst.

To that end, there's the Mac app Tumblr Backup, or the older, web-based Backup Jammy. Both keep all of your Tumblr data saved in easily viewable HTML format on your hard drive.

Tumblr Backup (an app officially from Tumblr) is a simple and self-explanatory app: just log in, tell it where you want to save your backup, and let it go to work. Note that it doesn't back up privabe tumbelogs, submissions, notes, feed-imported posts, or audio files from reblogged posts.

Tumblr Backup is a free download for Mac OS X. You can also backup tumblelogs with the web-based Backup Jammy, and it's equally easy to use.

If you're not a Tumblr user but you've still been scared into a backup frenzy after this weekend's events, you'll definitely want to check out previously mentioned Backupify for backing up your other services.

Send an email to Whitson Gordon, the author of this post, at whitson@lifehacker.com.

track');

Your version of Internet Explorer is not supported. Please upgrade to the most recent version in order to view comments.

Loading comments ... -/|\\\\\" /></div>  	</div>    	<div class=

In order to view comments on lifehacker.com you need to enable JavaScript.
If you are using Firefox and NoScript addon, please mark lifehacker.com as trusted.

Cool thing... all the things that i put on that website...

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

DIY: PDFpen Lets You Sign and Fill Out PDFs Print-Free [Downloads]

PDFpen Lets You Sign and Fill Out PDFs Print-Free

PDFpen Lets You Sign and Fill Out PDFs Print-FreePDFpen Lets You Sign and Fill Out PDFs Print-FreeMac: PDFpen is a smart and simple application that helps you fill out and sign PDFs without printing anything, perfect for times you have to fill out a little paperwork. No more print, sign, scan, then email.

PDFpen (made by the people who developed the incredibly time-saving text substitution app TextExpander) is perfect for anyone who fills out a lot of paperwork, but it's just as handy for those one-off documents. There's not much to getting started with it: Download the app, open it, pick a PDF to fill out, then grab the pen or text tool and get to work.

PDFpen is available as a free demo, but all PDFs saved with the trial will be waterstamped. That's good enough for a lot of paperwork (it's the version I use), but if you need it waterstamp-free, the $60 version removes the waterstamp. Thanks Matt and Jason!

PDFpen [Smile Software]

Send an email to Adam Pash, the author of this post, at tips+adam@lifehacker.com.

track');

Your version of Internet Explorer is not supported. Please upgrade to the most recent version in order to view comments.

Loading comments ... -/|\\\\\" /></div>  	</div>    	<div class=

In order to view comments on lifehacker.com you need to enable JavaScript.
If you are using Firefox and NoScript addon, please mark lifehacker.com as trusted.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

DIY : Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network [Screenshot Tour]

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social NetworkScreenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

With all the bad press surrounding Facebook this past year, a lot of us are looking for a good alternative. That's the need the new, open-source, user-controled social network Diaspora aims to fill. Here's what it looks like so far.

Note: Diaspora is still a pretty young tool, currently still in alpha—so don't expect the world. Click on any of the images to get a closer look.

Your Profile: Plain and Simple

Diaspora doesn't have nearly as many features as something like Facebook (or even Twitter, I'd wager), but it is in alpha—and it actually looks pretty cool. You start by getting your own Diaspora handle (like whitsongordon@joindiaspora.com), which people can use to find you. That handle doesn't seem to do anything else, which is remarkably confusing, since it's formatted like an email address. Emailing a message to someone's Diaspora handle just brings back a "delivery failed", so apparently the "@joindiaspora.com" part is just for show (or perhaps part of some future functionality).

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

Your profile is organized similar to a Facebook profile, with your profile picture in the upper left-hand corner, a short bio with your gender and birthdate under it, and your posts off to the right. As far as the "posts" section of a profile, it's more like Twitter than Facebook—your profile is composed only of posts you've written, and not posts by others (though they can contain comments from other users, à la Facebook). It doesn't look like there's a way to make a post on someone else's profile (like Facebook's "Wall"); only to your own.

Aspects: Friend Lists Made Easy

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social NetworkDiaspora heavily focuses on an organization feature called "aspects". The idea is that you have many different friends from different areas of your life: family, co-workers, your intramural hockey team, your Halo buddies, and whatever else you can make up. You can add people to any number of aspects and then post a status to Diaspora that only that aspect can see. This is handy if, say, you want to post about your most recent World of Warcraft conquest but don't want to clutter up your non-geek friends' feeds with such things. Aspects are private; only you can see your aspects and who belongs to them (so you could add your contacts to an "annoying people I don't like" aspect, though we wouldn't recommend it). Just as you can post to different aspects, you can also view feeds containing users only from a certain aspect, which is also nice.

As of right now, your profile is pretty bare information-wise. The profile creation page looks like this:

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

While there may very well be more additions to the profile in the future, we don't know. It might be more like Twitter with the bare profile, putting the focus on your posts and photos instead.

Getting Started With Diaspora

As of right now, Diaspora takes just a few minutes to get involved with; you just create your profile and start posting. You can post statuses, photos, and comment on other people's statuses. You can either post to all your aspects at once, or post to a specific aspect:

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

When someone requests to friend you on Diaspora, you'll get a notification email and a big red button on your home page (seriously, you can't miss it). When you click it, it'll show you your pending requests, and you can drag and drop them right into any aspect.

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social Network

You can edit your aspects at any time, adding people to more than one aspect if you like. You can also add a new aspect at any time.

Screenshot Tour of Diaspora, the Open-Source Social NetworkThe last feature available in the alpha is Facebook and Twitter integration, which takes an interesting approach to cross-network posting. You can post your Diaspora statuses to Twitter or Facebook, but at the moment there isn't a way to automatically pull your Twitter or Facebook statuses to Diaspora (though that may be in a future update). It's pretty basic, but nice for digital socialites that have accounts across multiple networks.

Overall, it actually looks pretty cool, even in its very basic alpha state. The main hinderances it's likely to encounter in its future are gaining an audience and making itself accessible. Obviously, a social network is only as useful as the people on it, and the best way to drive people away is to make it difficult to understand (how Twitter became so popular I'll never know). It took me a while of playing around and reading the wiki to figure out what aspects were and how they worked, which was pretty central to the site. If they can make it easy for people to understand, it could end up being pretty well-received. If you'd like to try out Diaspora yourself, you'll have to either find someone with invites, or keep an eye on the front page, since registration is currently closed.

What do you think of Diaspora this far? Could you see yourself being an early adopter (or even ditching Facebook or Twitter for it) once it becomes more public? Share your thoughts with us in the comments.

Send an email to Whitson Gordon, the author of this post, at whitson@lifehacker.com.

track');

Your version of Internet Explorer is not supported. Please upgrade to the most recent version in order to view comments.

Loading comments ... -/|\\\\\" /></div>  	</div>    	<div class=

In order to view comments on lifehacker.com you need to enable JavaScript.
If you are using Firefox and NoScript addon, please mark lifehacker.com as trusted.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog

Five Best Text Editors [Hive Five]

Five Best Text Editors

Five Best Text Editors

Despite decades of advancement in computing power, nothing has replaced the usefulness of a good text editor—whether you're managing a to-do list or elbow deep in code. Here's a look at five of the best text editors.

Photo by Jamie Cox.

Earlier this week we asked you to share your favorite text editor, and now we're back to share the results.

Notepad++ (Windows, Free)

Five Best Text Editors


Notepad++ is a popular Windows-based text editor. Unlike many text editors that have been ported to and fro, Notepad++ was built from the ground up to be a lightning fast Windows editor. Notepad++ supports tabbed editing, drag and drop text movement, a multi-item clipboard, split screen editing with synchronized scrolling, find and replace across multiple documents, and file comparison. If you're using Notepad++ for editing code, it supports syntax highlighting for over 48 programming languages, auto-completion, and includes a built-in FTP browser for accessing and updating remote code. In fact, if you're a big Notepad++ fan, it's worth your time to check out our guide to getting more plus out of Notepad++.

Vim (Windows/Mac OS X/Linux, Free)

Five Best Text Editors


Vim started life as a text editor for Amiga systems and has since been ported to nearly every OS around, from Windows to BeOS to every copy of Apple's Mac OS X. Like its forefather Vi, the base version of Vim is command line, not GUI, driven. If strictly command line isn't your thing, you might consider trying one of the several GUI wrappers available for Vim. You can read more about the different ports of Vim and the accompanying GUI wrappers here.

TextMate (Mac OS X, $54)

Five Best Text Editors


TextMate, a Mac OS X text editor, is heavily optimized for programmers, well-known and loved for its ability to create powerful "snippets"—text macros—templates, and custom commands. All of your customizations can be packed together in Bundles to create totally custom coding environments on a per-language and even per-document basis. (Though for most programming languages, someone's likely already done the heavy lifting for you—you can just download and install or use one of the many default bundles.) TextMate is the only commercial editor in this week's Hive Five but the 30-day trial provides adequate to take it for a free test drive.

Gedit (Windows/Mac OS X/Linux, Free)

Five Best Text Editors


Gedit, the default text editor for the GNOME Linux desktop, is an open source editor available for Linux environments as well as Windows and Mac OS X machines. Gedit is a GUI-based text editor with syntax highlighting, search and replace, undo, bracket matching, a tabbed interface and a plugin system for easy expansion—like the Snippets to add text macros and Document Statistics to analyze open documents.

Emacs (Windows/Mac OS X/Linux, Free)

Five Best Text Editors


Emacs is another programming-oriented editor packed with features that makes coding fast and efficient. Emacs features content-sensitive editing modes, syntax coloring, macro creation, and add-ons. The numerous add-ons for Emacs makes it by far the most extensible editor in this week's Hive Five.

Now that you've had a chance to look over the top five contenders for the best text editor it's time to cast your vote in the poll below:

Which Text Editor Is Best?customer surveys

Want to give a shoutout for your favorite text editor or a great add-on for it? Let's hear about it in the comments. Have an idea for the next Hive Five? Email us at tips@lifehacker.com with "Hive Five" in the subject line and we'll do our best to give your idea the attention it deserves.

Send an email to Jason Fitzpatrick, the author of this post, at jason@lifehacker.com.

track');

Your version of Internet Explorer is not supported. Please upgrade to the most recent version in order to view comments.

Loading comments ... -/|\\\\\" /></div>  	</div>    	<div class=

In order to view comments on lifehacker.com you need to enable JavaScript.
If you are using Firefox and NoScript addon, please mark lifehacker.com as trusted.

I realy love Notepadd++... it is the best... the ideal is Emacs.

Posted via email from Steve Prud'Homme DIY Blog